UNC Lenoir Health Care | 100 Airport Road | Kinston, NC 28501 | Phone (252) 522-7000 | info@lenoir.org

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Awareness

Treatment

Recovery

A brain aneurysm (burst or a weakened blood vessel leak – hemorrhagic) is one of two types of stroke.  While this is the least common of the two types of stroke, it most often results in death.

Hemorrhagic Stroke

When a blood vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot (ischemic). Learn more about the types of ischemic stroke.  

Ischemic Stroke

A blood vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot (ischemic) is one type of stroke. Learn more about the types of ischemic stroke.  

Ischemic Stroke

A blood vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot (ischemic) is one type of stroke. Learn more about the types of ischemic stroke.  

Ischemic Stroke

When blood flow to part of the brain stops for a short period of time, also called transient ischemic attack (TIA), it can mimic stroke-like symptoms. These appear and last less than 24 hours before disappearing. Learn more about the signs, your risk, and TIA management. 

What is TIA?

What is a Stroke?

A stroke is a "brain attack." It can happen to anyone at any time. It occurs when blood flow to an area of the brain is cut off. When this happens, brain cells are deprived of oxygen and begin to die. When brain cells die during a stroke, abilities controlled by that area of the brain, such as memory and muscle control, are lost.
 

 

How a person is affected by their stroke depends on where the stroke occurs in the brain and how much the brain is damaged. For example, someone who has a small stroke may only have minor problems, such as temporary weakness of an arm or leg. People who have larger strokes may be permanently paralyzed on one side of their body, or lose their ability to speak. Some people recover completely from strokes, but more than 2/3 of survivors will have some type of disability.

There is only one Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is given via intravenous therapy (IV) and works by dissolving the clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived of blood flow. tPA should be given within three hours (and up to 4.5 hours in certain eligible patients) of the time symptoms first started.

Drug Treatment

Some ischemic strokes are treated with small mechanical devices that remove or break up blood clots. If clot-busting drugs are ruled out, another option may be one one of the many FDA approved mechanical devices on the market. A surgeon inserts a small mechanical device into the blocked artery using a thin tube. Once inside, the tool traps the clot, and either breaks it up or the surgeon pulls it out of the brain, reopening the blocked blood vessel in the process.


A hemorrhagic stroke (sometimes called a bleed) occurs if an artery in your brain leaks blood or ruptures (breaks open). The first steps in treating a hemorrhagic stroke are to find the cause of bleeding in the brain and then control it. Some of the options for treatment include surgical clips or coils inserted in aneurisms (weaknesses in the blood vessel wall), controlling high blood pressure, and surgery to remove the bleeding vessel and blood that has spilled into the brain.


Medical advances have greatly improved survival rates and recovery from a stroke during the last decade. Your chances of survival and recovery outcomes are even better if the stroke is identified and treated immediately.

Mechanical Devices

A blood vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot (ischemic) is one type of stroke. Learn more about the types of ischemic stroke.  

Ischemic Stroke

A blood vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot (ischemic) is one type of stroke. Learn more about the types of ischemic stroke.  

Ischemic Stroke

Stroke TREATMENT

There are several treatment options for stroke depending on the cause of your stroke. If you are having an ischemic stroke or a stroke that is caused by a blood clot, your healthcare professional may recommend drug treatment.

Telestroke Robot

Certified Primary Stroke Center

The telestroke robot. Located in the Emergency Department, allows UNC Lenoir doctors and nurses to access a stroke expert at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston Salem 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Providing rapid treatment, administering clot-busting drugs, and working closely with statewide stroke experts culminated this year with a Joint Commission survey which resulted in Primary Stroke Center certification recognition for our program. Our stoke team is led by Dr. Manasi Gahlot and Stroke Coordinator Dawn Becker, RN, is posed to provide the best stroke care available.